Sunday, August 14, 2011

Materials and Techniques, Part III

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RULERS and GUIDES


Alumicutter ruler (18")

Image via www.dickblick.com
I bring this ruler nearly everywhere I go, all the time.  At 18", its only slightly awkward, much less so than my 24" Alumicutter.  This ruler is fantastic for inking and cutting paper, and it's got a raised foam back so the ink doesn't seep underneith.  They're a bit pricey, but hold up extremely well, so there's no real reason for you to replace it.  Consider this an investment.

French Curves-

I'm pretty sure I have a C-Thru set, as pictured below.

Image via www.dickblick.com
I honestly don't use these as often as I should.  They're great for creating a perfect curved edge when you're inking.

Ship Curves

Image via www.amazon.com
Another tool I don't utilize often enough. 

Drawing Board:

Image via www.dickblick.com

Believe it or not, not only do I have a really nice drafting table that I don't use, but I have a really nice drawing board with feet that adjust the height that I ALSO DO NOT USE.  I do, however, use a really crappy drawing board I stole from my younger brother when he was in middle school and I was in highschool.  I have since given him a much bigger drawing board, but I still use the 16"x15" board.  My board has two clamps, and I had to buy a rubber band to go around it, but these are pretty similar to what I have.  I bring my board and my ruler everywhere and constantly use it as my drawing surface.  When space permits, I even bring it to conventions, because everyone knows there isnt room enough at those tables for wares AND art.

TECHNICAL STUFF:

Printer/scanner/copier/fax/coffeemaker

Image via www.amazon.com
It's not particularly great at any of these functions, but it gets the job done in a large format, so I don't have to constantly spend my time at school jockeying for a printer.  As I was typing this, the darn thing turned itself on, which is JUST A BIT FREAKY TO ME.

PROGRAMS:

Photoshop CS5-  Like you DONT know.
JPEGCROPS- Great for mass cropping of similiar sized files (like scans from a sketchbook, for example).

MARKERS:


These are MY markers in MY markerbox with MY Copic swatchbook.  NOT some pretty image from the internet.  I have to admit, I'm a little proud of myself on this one.  I used to use Prismacolors back in the day, but Copics really won me over with their fantastic brush tips.  I can get some effects that are nearly watercolor.  They're a lot of fun to render with, are refillable and have replaceable nibs, and there are all sorts of neat toys you can use with them (like the airbrush I am lusting over).

There's a lot of whining about how expensive Copics are, particularly Copic sketches.  I have two solutions for you.  1.  You can use Copic Ciao, which are less expensive, but I've never used, so I can't recommend, or you can do what I do and 2. Buy a few (a very few) every time you go to the art store.  Even if it's just ONE each time you go, you'll slowly build up a collection.  Make sure you start with the most important colors (skintones, IMO) and work from there, buying colors you will actually use.  I started my set with the Primary collection of 12 because it went on sale on Amazon about a year ago, and then branched out into the warm grays, which are really very useful.  There are a lot of great resources for markers online, and no, a set of Crayolas will not replace a set of decent markers if you are serious about rendering with marker.


BONUS:
And here are the contents of my pencil pouch, along with my Alumicutter on my drawing board.

I plan on doing an inking process entry next, so you guys can see my abused Multiliners and gelpens then.  ISNT THIS EXCITING?!~