Thursday, January 31, 2019

Weekly Art Stream

If you enjoy my art, my art supply reviews, or my tutorials,then you need to join me for Power Hour!



What's Power Hour?
  • Free sketch requests
  • Drawing Demos
  • Art supply raffles
  • Art Supply Demos


Power Hour is my weekly artstream over on Youtube!  We begin at 8PM, and where the evening goes is up to you!  Want me to draw your character live on air?  We can make that happen!  Interested in learning a new drawing technique?  Shout it out!  Want to see a product demonstration?  Let me know, I can probably make it happen.  Power Hour is our opportunity to hang out, get to know one another, and maybe learn something new!

Power Hour's gone on for three weeks now, so I feel like we've hit a good rhythm and I'm finally ready to announce it to the masses!



You can make sure you never miss a Power Hour by subscribing to my Channel and hitting the little bell notification!

Missed our first three streams?  Here're the highlights!

Week 1


  • Alcohol marker doodle
  • Sketch Requests
  • Surface Design Demonstration
  • Zebra Mechanical Pencil Demonstration










Week 2



  • Sketch Request
  • Alcohol Marker Commission
  • Cut paper demonstration






Week 3



  • Sketch Request
  • Figure Drawing Demo
  • Multi-color pencil Demo
  • Watercolor Confections Watercolor Swatches
  • Watercolor Confections Raffle
  • Succulent Painting Demo









Sounds amazing?  Then join us tomorrow night at 8PM, over on my Youtube

Monday, January 21, 2019

Choose Your Own Adventure- Watercolor Edition

One of the magic things about using watercolor for illustration and comics is that it's a bit like choosing your own adventure.  Do you want to use hot press or cold press?  Cellulose or cotton rag?  Do you want to dive straight in to watercolor, sketch with a pencil, print out bluelines, or ink?  Every choice can yeild a different results, and it's helpful to know what your options are.

Today, we're going to talk about different types of finish for your watercolors.  How you want to create your lineart (or whether you want a lineart at all!) can drastically change the end aesthetic of your comics and illustrations.  Below are a few of my favorite methods.

Inks

Method:
Graphite pencil, brushpen, then erase the graphite.  Paint.

Inks that Work:
Waterproof India Inks (make sure they say waterproof on the bottle)
Acrylic Inks
Pigment Based Inks
Ink Used:  Sakura Pigma Professional FB brushpen (pigment based)

End Result:


Other Examples of Inked Watercolors:





Pencils

Method:
Printed bluelines, then tight pencils.  Paint.

Recommended Leads:
HB or harder



End Result:




Other Examples of Penciled Watercolors:




Method:
Graphite pencil sketch.  Paint

End Result:

Method:
Graphite Transfer.  Paint.  'Inking' with paint.

End Result:



Colored Leads

Method:
Colored Lead.  Paint.

Colored Leads that Work:
Color Eno Leads
Harder, waxed based color pencils

"Lineless" Watercolor Style:



End Result:


Other Examples of "Lineless" Watercolor:






Inking After Painting:

Method:  Sketch illustration.  Paint.  Ink accents.

Any ink will work with this method, so long as you aren't adding water again.


End Result:

Other Examples of Inking After Painting:





Straight to Watercolor

Process: Sketch directly with watercolor, focusing on mark making and shapes.

See:  Chinese watercolor, Japanese sumi-e, loose floral watercolors





I hope this has inspired you to try various methods of 'finish' with your own watercolor art and illustration!  If you're looking for more inspiration, make sure you check out my Watercolor Basics series, here and on Youtube.

Thursday, January 17, 2019

Getting To Know: Traditional Comic Materials

What's In My Pencilcase-2018 Edition


Every artist has their preferred tools, but some basics are pretty common from artist to artist.

Basics:

Erasers
Pencils
Ruler
Paper

White Stroke eraser, Color Eno (Pink), Color Eno (Soft Blue), Mono Knock Eraser, Pentel Icy (HB lead), Pentel Graph Gear 1000 (B lead) Clear, gridded acrylic ruler, Prismacolor Color Pencil
From left to right: White Stroke eraser, Color Eno (Pink), Color Eno (Soft Blue), Mono Knock Eraser, Pentel Icy (HB lead), Pentel Graph Gear 1000 (B lead) Clear, gridded acrylic ruler, Prismacolor Color Pencil

Prismacolor Pencil Sketch

As an artist, you will eventually develop your own preferences, but hopefully this post can get you off to a strong start!

Pencils

Pentel Graph Gear 1000 with Staad Pencil Grip, Pilot Color Eno
Pencils used to pencil thumbnails and roughs-Pentel Graph Gear 1000 with Staad Pencil Grip, Pilot Color Eno

Pencils and Erasers used for thumbnails and roughs stages of comics
Pencils and Erasers used for thumbnails and roughs stages of comics

Generally, I prefer mechanical and drafting pencils to wooden, as I hate taking time to sharpen my pencil, and I hate dull leads!  I prefer Japanese brands to American brands, as Japanese stationery brands tend to be better designed and better built.  However, you can find many Japanese brands even at your local Walmart- Pentel, Zebra, and Uni are all commonly carried.

The exception in my preference comes down to sketching and warmups- for warmups and doodles, I prefer using colored pencils, and frequently use Prismacolor pencils in warm earthtones such as terra-cotta.

What's the difference between Drafting Pencils and Mechanical Pencils?

Mechanical Pencils:

Mechanical pencils can be made from a variety of materials (wood, plastic, metal), and frequently, but not always, feature refillable, replacable lead.  They may feature back, side, shake, or even twist advancement of the lead.  Mechanical pencils provide a consistent lineweight without need for sharpening.

Drafting Pencils:

Often drafting pencils fall into the category of mechanical pencils, but not always.  Lead holders, which are a type of drafting pencil, are not mechanical pencils, and are desigend with a clutch mechanism to hold larger leads (1mm-2mm).

'Drafting pencil' often refers to a metal bodied mechanical pencil with a back advancement.  Popular materials include brass and aluminum.  Drafting pencils often have knurled metal grips, which can damage your hands, and have no give in the body, which can lead to arthritis over time.

Drafting pencils feature a metal lead sleeve, which protects the lead when it's advanced, and prevents breakage.  Many drafting pencils also feature a spring mechanism that acts as a shock absorber- a handy feature for those of us who are heavy handed.  Many drafting pencils also include an eraser cap, and a lead indicator, which can be manually changed depending on the lead used.

Lead Holders: 

Lead holders hold larger leads (1mm-2mm) that may require sharpening with a lead pointer.  Lead holders are all clutch mechanism (a jawed pressure clamp that holds the lead in place), and are typically metal bodied.

I'm Using:

Pilot Color Eno Mechanical Pencil (.7mm, soft pink and soft blue, used for underdrawing)
Pentel Icy (.7mm, contains HB lead, used for sketching)
Pentel Graph Gear 1000, with a Staad pencil grip (.7mm, B lead, used for tight pencils)

Leads
Muji Mechanical Pencil, Pentel Red Lead, Pentel Graph Gear 1000, Pentel Ain B lead, Pentel Icy, Pentel Hi Polymer H lead, Pilot Color Ino, Pilot Color Eno Soft Blue Lead
Mechanical pencils paired with the leads used in them.  Left to Right: Muji Mechanical Pencil, Pentel Red Lead, Pentel Graph Gear 1000, Pentel Ain B lead, Pentel Icy, Pentel Hi Polymer H lead, Pilot Color Ino, Pilot Color Eno Soft Blue Lead

If you're using mechanical pencils or drafting pencils, then you're also going to be using leads.  Many pencils come with refills, but as an artist, you may wish to branch out and find your own preferred materials.

Why Non Photo Blue?

Non photo blue (and other colored leads) are frequently used by artists for underdrawing and sketching.  Sketching in a colored lead makes it easy to differentiate between construction and details you wish to keep, and you can pencil over these colored leads, ink, or even go straight to watercolor or alcohol marker.

Originally NPB would not scan or photo copy (hence the non photo part).  These days, scanners are much more sophisticated, and will pick up NPB, but it's easy to digitally drop light colors such as pink, light blue, and especially yellow.  I have tutorials on this blog on how to drop the blues.

I'm Using:

Pentel Hi Polymer HB Lead
Pentel HiPolymer B Lead
Color Eno Soft Blue Lead
Pentel .5mm Red Lead

Colored Pencils

Commonly Used:

Palomino Blackwing Pencils
Palomino 602
Palomino Blackwing Pearl

Col-Erase Colored Pencils (light blue)
Caran d'Ache Sketcher

I'm Using:

Prismacolor Color Pencils- Terra Cotta 

Erasers
 Pentel Clic Erase, Tombow Mono Knock Eraser, Tombo Zero Eraser, Creative Mark White Stroke
Left to Right:  Pentel Clic Erase, Tombow Mono Knock Eraser, Tombo Zero Eraser, Creative Mark White Stroke

When selecting erasers, I want erasers that will:

  • Not Tear Up My Paper
  • Not Cause Ghosting with My Ink
  • Don't Smear

I've tried a lot of erasers over the years, and while I rotate what I use, I do have some favorites that I hope you guys will check out!

I'm Using: 

Pentel HiPolymer Eraser
Mono Eraser
White Stroke Eraser
Moo Eraser
Mono Knock Eraser
Pentel Ain Eraser
Mono Zero 
Pentel Click Erase

Everyday Carry



This just refers to the case you use for your daily use art supplies!  This is going to vary heavily from artist to artist, and I have several great recommendations in my 2018 Comic Artist Gift Guide.  I'm using a Nomadic pencil case that doesn't seem to be commonly available anymore.

So those are my basic, everyday comic supplies!  Keep an eye on this blog for more detailed, deeper dives into my comic artist supplies!

Resources Used:
Mechanical Pencil (Wikipedia)
How A Drafting Pencil Works
Ink and Graphite- What is a drafting pencil?
Cult Pens: Guide to Mechanical Pencils
Jackson's Art:  Why Use a Clutch Pencil