Tuesday, December 13, 2011

Art Supplies (for YOU~!)

While I was in Japan, I thought to myself "how can I share the bounty that is cheap Japanese art supplies with my followers and friends, while still benefitting myself".  The answer hit me like a smackeral of mackeral to the face:  A giveaway where you earn your chance to win by commenting!

It's genius, really.  You leave good comments, you increase your chances of winning.  A good comment is any comment that contributes positively to this blog- pointing out an omission, providing information, sharing relevant links, offering critique and criticism.  Basically, a good comment contributes content.  On February 3rd (my dad's birthday, but this is of no relevance to you), I shall tally up the comments and announce the winner.  At any time, you may read through the archives and see who's got the most comments, and hustle your bustle to beat 'em.  It's all out in the open for you to keep track of, no ugly surprises.

Now, I wouldnt ask so much of my readers if I didn't have a really good prize pack to share.  This is what I consider essential- the tools I swear by.

You'll have to excuse the crummy photography.  In my haste to share this bounty with you guys, I couldn't wait for the sun to come up, and the lighting in my apartment is dim and depressing and doesn't suit my finicky camera.
Already you can tell through the see-through case that this thing is packed full of goodies.
Yes, grainy photography REALLY makes you want to compete for my favor.  It may be time to invest in a better camera.
I mean, check out this spread- I really went all out.  These are the supplies I swear by (with exception of the Eno Color in .7, I honestly could not find ANY Uni Color in non photo blue in .7, not for me, not for you, not for the love of all that is holy).  You get not one, but TWO mechanical pencils- the light blue plastic one is for your non photo blue lead, the heavy duty metal Pentel GraphGear1000 (with retractable sleeve, heck yeah) is for your fancy B high purity graphite that I've kindly included.  You get a knock type Mono eraser as well as one of those teeny teeny tiny Mono erasers for the small fiddy bits, and a big hulkin' Mono eraser for entire drawings that just must go, a Signo white gel pen (the Cadillac of gel pens, IMO), as well as a fine tipped ball point pen (I swear by these for sketching).  I don't even WANT to tally up the cost, because it was a princely sum, and I'm going to have it shipped to you, dear commenter with the most to contribute, by mid Feb.

Lets go in for the brand name close ups:



As you can see, I deliver the good stuff.  And I know you want it.  So get commentin'!

23 comments:

  1. Those are some lovely art supplies :D

    Out of curiosity, ow much cheaper are they?

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  2. @Touch of Whimsy

    Copics, for example, were about 3.50 USD to 4.00, as opposed to 5-6USD each. Watercolors made by Japanese brands are also a lot cheaper than their US equivalents, and it's easy to find pan travel watercolors as well as empty palettes.

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  3. You caught me through the Ink Links that the Pen Addict sent out. I saw "art supplies" and said, oh, yes, that's the place for meeeee.

    So, hi :D

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  4. Looks like one of my orders from JetPens

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  5. Very cool. Would love to see what Takashi Nagai would have done with these kind of things.

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  6. Ohhh...this would make a perfect travel sketch kit!!!

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  7. Great giveaway! that Tombow Mono eraser was just named best mechanical pencil item of the year over at Dave's Mechanical Pencils - would love to try it.

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  8. Have you ever tried nature printing, esp. gyotaku. I think that the colored leads might be very nice for adding eyes to gyotaku if done on washi.

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  9. Beautiful set! Out of curiosity what brand of ball point pen is that?

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  10. @Gwynne Platz Hello and welcome! I have some Japanese erasers that I need to review as well as some Japanese tech pens. This'll happen as soon as I'm caught up on commissions.

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  11. @Jeff It's hard to say no to Japanese art supplies.

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  12. @David I feel like it is. I carry around a similar kit in my purse for daily drawing, and it's served me well.

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  13. @Julie (O-kami) I'll have to check out his review. I love Mono erasers, but I'm curious about what other brands he's tested.

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  14. @Doug D. I have not, but I've always admired it from afar.

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  15. A friend of mine has done some amazing gyotaku, mostly on cloth: www2a.biglobe.ne.jp/~gyotaku/
    including one of a giant squid and another of a live horse.

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  16. I used to have a complete,
    but lost by a fall while riding the bus

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  17. That's a nice package! I wish that I was able to shop for more than a few hours on a layover in Japan. I only managed to get a brush pen since the mall I went to was only Japanese. Would love to try all of these items! :D Thanks for thinking of us! :D

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  18. Are there other sets of the uniColor leads for sale out there or do they just make the set you have there?

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  19. Since this is Japanese themed, and it's Christmas time, have you seen Smile (Smairu no Sinseiki), the movie about ice hockey, Hokkaido , and The Little Drummer Boy? Sounds cheesy, but really touching.

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  20. I have a different one of the fine Mono erasers and it's probably one of the most useful tools I have. It certainly was in my Drawing II class, when it became a full fledged tool, particularly handy when working subtractively or on refined technical pieces. That and the Tombow pencil alone would make this a desirable package of supplies.

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  21. How much heavier than a plastic-bodied lead holder are the metal ones? I've only ever used the former.

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  22. A follow up to the earlier comment about how Takashi Nagai might use these supplies: I saw another post of yours where you mention going to Adoration with your family (very cool; we take our kids once a week). I am a Catholic, too, and I was thinking of his artistic work including drawing and calligraphy when I made my earlier comment. In case you or anyone seeing this comment doesn't know about him, he was the son of a doctor, raised a Buddhist. He converted while a student in Nagasaki and married into the mosty prominent family of what had been the Hidden Christians of Nagasaki. He went on to become a groundbreaking radiologist, and he survived the nuclear blast in Nagasaki that killed his wife and destroyed the Urakami Cathedral in their neighborhood. He became famous for his efforts, during the 6 or so years which he lived after WWII, to help his neighbors and for the deep spiritual meaning he found in all of the tragedy. He wrote 20 or more books during that time as he was dying of leukemia and became a hero for all Japanese. You can find an excellent biography of him by Fr. Paul Glynn which is print as well as out-of-print used copies of some of his books as translated into English (I have Leaving My Dear Children Behind as well as The Bells of Nagasaki). There is also an excellent English-language video available which spends about half of its time on his life and work, called A Hill of Redemption (http://www.101foundation.com/catalog/index.php?target=products&product_id=301).

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